Nova Delphini 2013

Nova Delphini 2013 on August 16, 2013 Image: Andrew Dumont

Nova Delphini 2013 on August 16, 2013 Image: Andrew Dumont

A new “star” popped up late last week.  I didn’t get an opportunity to take a look until night before last. I was glad I did too!

First things first, this Nova was discovered by Koichi Itagaki (Teppo-cho, Yamagata, Japan), reported by S. Nakano (Sumoto, Japan) on August 14, 2013. Initially it was pretty bright at a mag. 6.8. By the time I got skies it was in the mag 4.5 range.

The moon isn’t helping because it is washing Nova Delphini out a little but this is still a BINOCULAR target! I’ve seen it in both the scope and binoculars.

If you have fair skies you can take a look (provided you can see the stars Deneb and Vega in the northern hemisphere). I’ve included telescope coordinates for those with telescopes.

If you don’t have a scope or don’t have the faintest idea how to use the one you might have access to other than set it up and point it. Here’s how to find it:

Two methods:

The first is how I found it with binoculars you can refer to a finders chart, and by the way the location marked is only approximate however the coordinates are correct.

Find Vega / Find Deneb both are easy and bright, now find Altair. Draw a line from Altair (the moon works too) to Deneb look along that line until you are across from Vega. It is the bright spot apart from those larger stars.

Another way is to to use a compass and orient yourself at:

Azimuth = 105°17′  and
Altitude 59°25′ .

That will put you right near it.

I did not get a camera on it due to less than desirable atmospheric sky conditions and a barn fire about a mile away (no animals were hurt) puring out smoke, but my brother Andrew, despite his own very milky skies did and the image above is his. Thanks bro!

Here is a very nice image from Efrain Morales via Flickr taken on August 16, 2013.

Like I said the moon is bothering things some, but if you get a chance try taking a look.