Sagittarius A

Sagittarius A - The Central Milky Way Image credit: X-ray: NASA/UMass/D.Wang et al., IR: NASA/STScI

Sagittarius A – The Central Milky Way Image credit: X-ray: NASA/UMass/D.Wang et al., IR: NASA/STScI

I always enjoy these looks into the center of our Milky Way especially these collaborations between telescopic instruments.

At about 8,000 parsecs the black hole is close enough for pretty decent observations and finding surprises. Looks like less than 1 percent of material in the grasp of the black know actually gets assimilated?

Didn’t see that one coming.

Here is the Chandra press release (get larger images here too):

The center of the Milky Way galaxy, with the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), located in the middle, is revealed in these images. As described in our press release, astronomers have used NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory to take a major step in understanding why material around Sgr A* is extraordinarily faint in X-rays.

The large image contains X-rays from Chandra in blue and infrared emission from the Hubble Space Telescope in red and yellow. The inset shows a close-up view of Sgr A* in X-rays only, covering a region half a light year wide. The diffuse X-ray emission is from hot gas captured by the black hole and being pulled inwards. This hot gas originates from winds produced by a disk-shaped distribution of young massive stars observed in infrared observations.
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