Tsunami Hits Voyager

An artists concept Voyager 1 spacecraft entering the space between stars. Interstellar space is dominated by plasma, ionized gas (shown here as brownish haze), that was thrown off by giant stars millions of years ago. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

An artists concept Voyager 1 spacecraft entering the space between stars. Interstellar space is dominated by plasma, ionized gas (shown here as brownish haze), that was thrown off by giant stars millions of years ago. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Voyager 1 spacecraft now has felt another “tsunami wave”, a pressure wave generated by a coronal mass ejection from the sun. The “tsunami wave” takes about a year to reach Voyager and they can tell because of the way the thin plasma around the spacecraft acts.

The weird thing is this plasma is denser than what Voyager was flying through previously.  All of this points to more evidence the Voyagers have entered the area of interstellar space outside our solar bubble.  Yeah that’s way out – Go Voyagers!

More dense? Confused? I was too, read the explanation from the NASA JPL site below:

NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft has experienced a new “tsunami wave” from the sun as it sails through interstellar space. Such waves are what led scientists to the conclusion, in the fall of 2013, that Voyager had indeed left our sun’s bubble, entering a new frontier.

“Normally, interstellar space is like a quiet lake,” said Ed Stone of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, the mission’s project scientist since 1972. “But when our sun has a burst, it sends a shock wave outward that reaches Voyager about a year later. The wave causes the plasma surrounding the spacecraft to sing.”

Data from this newest tsunami wave generated by our sun confirm that Voyager is in interstellar space — a region between the stars filled with a thin soup of charged particles, also known as plasma. The mission has not left the solar system — it has yet to reach a final halo of comets surrounding our sun — but it broke through the wind-blown bubble, or heliosphere, encasing our sun. Voyager is the farthest human-made probe from Earth, and the first to enter the vast sea between stars.
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