Category Archives: Juno

The Best So Far

Wow! What a great job by Kevin Gill the citizen scientist who produced this beautiful image of Jupiter using data from the JunoCam aboard the Juno spacecraft. I think this is the best JunoCam submission so far, really good. You can click the image above for a larger view and go to the JunoCam site to see the full sized version and it is worth it – seriously have a look.  Happily, you might disagree about this being the best so far; after all there ARE quite a few to choose from.

Don’t forget — YOU can also try your hand at working with the JunoCam data to create images like this.  In fact NASA has gone out of their way to make it easy,  When you have something you like you can even upload them to share on the NASA site.  How?  Easy, just go to the JunoCam Image Processing Gallery and click on the Submissions Guidelines link.

Here’s the original caption:

Colorful swirling cloud belts dominate Jupiter’s southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

Jupiter appears in this color-enhanced image as a tapestry of vibrant cloud bands and storms. The dark region in the far left is called the South Temperate Belt. Intersecting the belt is a ghost-like feature of slithering white clouds. This is the largest feature in Jupiter’s low latitudes that’s a cyclone (rotating with clockwise motion).

This image was taken on Dec. 16, 2017 at 10:12 PST (1:12 p.m. EST), as Juno performed its tenth close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 8,453 miles (13,604 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of 27.9 degrees south.

The spatial scale in this image is 5.6 miles/pixel (9.1 kilometers/pixel).

Citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager.

JunoCam’s raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products.

More information about Juno is online at http://www.nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. Juno is part of NASA’s New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages JPL for NASA.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill

Near Jupiter’s Cloudtops

The Juno spacecraft was only 18,906 km / 11,747 miles above the cloud tops of Jupiter – pretty bold.

Here’s the original caption: See Jovian clouds in striking shades of blue in this new view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

The Juno spacecraft captured this image when the spacecraft was only 11,747 miles (18,906 kilometers) from the tops of Jupiter’s clouds — that’s roughly as far as the distance between New York City and Perth, Australia. The color-enhanced image, which captures a cloud system in Jupiter’s northern hemisphere, was taken on Oct. 24, 2017 at 10:24 a.m. PDT (1:24 p.m. EDT) when Juno was at a latitude of 57.57 degrees (nearly three-fifths of the way from Jupiter’s equator to its north pole) and performing its ninth close flyby of the gas giant planet.

The spatial scale in this image is 7.75 miles/pixel (12.5 kilometers/pixel).

Because of the Juno-Jupiter-Sun angle when the spacecraft captured this image, the higher-altitude clouds can be seen casting shadows on their surroundings. The behavior is most easily observable in the whitest regions in the image, but also in a few isolated spots in both the bottom and right areas of the image.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager.

JunoCam’s raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products.

Great job! Credits: Gerald Eichstädt / Seán Doran /JUNO

Moon Shadow

What a nice image of a moon shadow on Jupiter.  Wanted to show this and hopefully I can in-between internet and power outages – it’s really windy and believe it or not most leaves are STILL on the trees.

Nice processing work on the Juno image from Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran (see below).  Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran

More about Amalthea from NASA.  Click the image below for a larger version.

From NASA – Jupiter’s moon Amalthea casts a shadow on the gas giant planet in this image captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The elongated shape of the shadow is a result of both the location of the moon with relation to Jupiter in this image as well as the irregular shape of the moon itself.

The image was taken on Sept. 1, 2017 at 2:46 p.m. PDT (5:46 p.m. EDT), as Juno performed its eighth close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was 2,397 miles (3,858 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of 17.6 degrees.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. The image has been rotated so that the top of the image is actually the equatorial regions while the bottom of the image is of the northern polar regions of the planet.

JunoCam’s raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products.

 

Io and Europa

Another really great JunoCam image; this one processed by citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko.

NASA – This color-enhanced image of Jupiter and two of its largest moons — Io and Europa — was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it performed its eighth flyby of the gas giant planet.

The image was taken on Sept. 1, 2017 at 3:14 p.m. PDT (6:14 p.m. EDT). At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 17,098 miles (27,516 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of minus 49.372 degrees.

Closer to the planet, the Galilean moon of Io can be seen at an altitude of 298,880 miles (481,000 kilometers) and at a spatial scale of 201 miles (324 kilometers) per pixel. In the distance (to the left), another one of Jupiter’s Galilean moons, Europa, is visible at an altitude of 453,601 miles (730,000 kilometers) and at a spatial scale of 305 miles (492 kilometers) per pixel.

Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Roman Tkachenko

Juno Looks at Jupiter’s Northern Lights

Jupiter has pretty impressive auroras as Juno can attest. This particular aurora in Jupiter’s north is not from the recent solar flare responsible for ours.  The CME associated with our current storm occurred on 04 September and arrived here late yesterday, so it has a ways to go before it gets to Jupiter – about 4 more AU.

This particular view is from Juno’s it was taken by Juno’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVS) instrument on 11 December 2016 which also explains why Jupiter is not visible.

This could be just me, but the aurora looks sort of happy to be there.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI
.

SPECTACULAR!

A breath taking image and great work from citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran using data from  the Juno spacecraft and publicly available at JunoCam. Fantastic job!!!!  Be sure to click the image for  the larger version.

NASA’s caption: A dynamic storm at the southern edge of Jupiter’s northern polar region dominates this Jovian cloudscape, courtesy of NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

This storm is a long-lived anticyclonic oval named North North Temperate Little Red Spot 1 (NN-LRS-1); it has been tracked at least since 1993, and may be older still. An anticyclone is a weather phenomenon where winds around the storm flow in the direction opposite to that of the flow around a region of low pressure. It is the third largest anticyclonic oval on the planet, typically around 3,700 miles (6,000 kilometers) long. The color varies between red and off-white (as it is now), but this JunoCam image shows that it still has a pale reddish core within the radius of maximum wind speeds.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran processed this image using data from the JunoCam imager. The image has been rotated so that the top of the image is actually the equatorial regions while the bottom of the image is of the northern polar regions of the planet.

The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 6:42 p.m. PDT (9:42 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its seventh close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 7,111 miles (11,444 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of 44.5 degrees.

Great Red Spot

LAUNCH TO THE ISS TODAY AT 15:41 UTC / 11:41 EDT) – CHECK BACK AT AT 15:30 UTC / 11:30 EDT FOR LAUNCH COVERAGE.

The image above is Jupiter’s Great Red Spot in true color.

NASA – This image of Jupiter’s iconic Great Red Spot (GRS) was created by citizen scientist Björn Jónsson using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

This true-color image offers a natural color rendition of what the Great Red Spot and surrounding areas would look like to human eyes from Juno’s position. The tumultuous atmospheric zones in and around the Great Red Spot are clearly visible.

The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:10 p.m. PDT (10:10 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its seventh close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 8,648 miles (13,917 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of -32.6 degrees.

JunoCam’s raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Bjorn Jonsson

The Great Red Spot!

Hey look at this! Yesterday I said the Juno images would be available on 14 July, well NASA came through early!

This is my rendition of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. You know, I do have Photoshop on another computer that is currently in storage. I should get it out and fire it up. In the mean time, I did this from the original located at JunoCam (it is the TAN SEASHORE link).

Click here for my version, of the complete image.

and

Click here for the original if you have trouble at the JunoCam site, which is doubtful.  Download it and see what you can do.

JUNO Flyby Day

The Juno spacecraft will make a flyby of Jupiter today and it is going to fly right over that iconic superstorm we all know as the Great Red Spot. The image above is NOT from the flyby or Juno, actually it is from the Cassini spacecraft from a distance of 10 million km during a flyby on the way to Saturn (29 December 2000).  If you click the image above you will give you the entire photo, I isolated the Great Red Spot  mostly because I love those white squiggly clouds below it.

Last time around the images came back rather quickly as memory serves, perhaps these will too.

NASA – Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, the gas giant’s iconic, 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. This will be humanity’s first up-close and personal view of the gigantic feature — a storm monitored since 1830 and possibly existing for more than 350 years.

“Jupiter’s mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “This monumental storm has raged on the solar system’s biggest planet for centuries. Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating science instruments will dive in to see how deep the roots of this storm go, and help us understand how this giant storm works and what makes it so special.”

The data collection of the Great Red Spot is part of Juno’s sixth science flyby over Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops. Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s center) will be on Monday, July 10, at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno will be about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno will have covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and will be directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. The spacecraft will pass about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Giant Red Spot clouds. All eight of the spacecraft’s instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, will be on during the flyby.

On July 4 at 7:30 p.m. PDT (10:30 p.m. EDT), Juno will have logged exactly one year in Jupiter orbit. At the time, the spacecraft will have chalked up about 71 million miles (114.5 million kilometers) in orbit around the giant planet.

“The success of science collection at Jupiter is a testament to the dedication, creativity and technical abilities of the NASA-Juno team,” said Rick Nybakken, project manager for Juno from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “Each new orbit brings us closer to the heart of Jupiter’s radiation belt, but so far the spacecraft has weathered the storm of electrons surrounding Jupiter better than we could have ever imagined.”

Juno launched on Aug. 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. During its mission of exploration, Juno soars low over the planet’s cloud tops — as close as about 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers). During these flybys, Juno is probing beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and studying its auroras to learn more about the planet’s origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission portray the largest planet in our solar system as a turbulent world, with an intriguingly complex interior structure, energetic polar aurora, and huge polar cyclones.

Image: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A Nice Look at Jupiter

Take a look at this beautiful contribution on the JunoCam website. Very nice work!

This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s bands of light and dark clouds was created by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft.

Three of the white oval storms known as the “String of Pearls” are visible near the top of the image. Each of the alternating light and dark atmospheric bands in this image is wider than Earth, and each rages around Jupiter at hundreds of miles (kilometers) per hour. The lighter areas are regions where gas is rising, and the darker bands are regions where gas is sinking.

Juno acquired the image on May 19, 2017, at 11:30 a.m. PST (2:30 p.m. EST) from an altitude of about 20,800 miles (33,400 kilometers) above Jupiter’s cloud tops.

JunoCam’s raw images are available at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam for the public to peruse and process into image products.

Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran