Category Archives: NASA

NASA’s Newest Astronauts

One presumably young lady said in the comments for this video: “I will be in one of these videos someday.” and to that I say, I hope so!!

Also it could go without saying (and almost did), Good luck and congratulations to the new astronauts!

The Europa Clipper

NASA – NASA’s upcoming mission to investigate the habitability of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa now has a formal name: Europa Clipper.

The moniker harkens back to the clipper ships that sailed across the oceans of Earth in the 19th century. Clipper ships were streamlined, three-masted sailing vessels renowned for their grace and swiftness. These ships rapidly shuttled tea and other goods back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean and around globe.

In the grand tradition of these classic ships, the Europa Clipper spacecraft would sail past Europa at a rapid cadence, as frequently as every two weeks, providing many opportunities to investigate the moon up close. The prime mission plan includes 40 to 45 flybys, during which the spacecraft would image the moon’s icy surface at high resolution and investigate its composition and the structure of its interior and icy shell.

Europa has long been a high priority for exploration because it holds a salty liquid water ocean beneath its icy crust. The ultimate aim of Europa Clipper is to determine if Europa is habitable, possessing all three of the ingredients necessary for life: liquid water, chemical ingredients, and energy sources sufficient to enable biology.

“During each orbit, the spacecraft spends only a short time within the challenging radiation environment near Europa. It speeds past, gathers a huge amount of science data, then sails on out of there,” said Robert Pappalardo, Europa Clipper project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Previously, when the mission was still in the conceptual phase, it was sometimes informally called Europa Clipper, but NASA has now adopted that name as the former title for the mission.

The mission is being planned for launch in the 2020s, arriving in the Jupiter system after a journey of several years.

JPL manages the mission for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

Europa Mission to Phase B

Good news! According to the following press release the Europa mission is moving along, oh it will be a good while before this off the ground, but this is a critical hurdle.

From NASA:

On Feb. 15, NASA’s Europa multiple-flyby mission successfully completed its Key Decision Point-B review. This NASA decision permits the mission to move forward into its preliminary design phase, known as “Phase B,” beginning on Feb. 27.

A highlight of Phase A was the selection and accommodation of 10 instruments being developed to study the scientific mysteries of Europa. The new mission phase is planned to continue through September 2018, and will result in the completion of a preliminary design for the mission’s systems and subsystems. Some testing of spacecraft components, including solar cells and science instrument detectors, has already been underway during Phase A, and this work is planned to continue into Phase B.

In addition, during Phase B subsystem vendors will be selected, as well as prototype hardware elements for the science instruments. Spacecraft subassemblies will be built and tested as well.

The Europa mission spacecraft is being planned for launch in the 2020s, arriving in the Jupiter system after a journey of several years. The spacecraft would orbit Jupiter as frequently as every two weeks, providing many opportunities for close flybys of Europa. The mission plan includes 40 to 45 flybys in the prime mission, during which the spacecraft would image the moon’s icy surface at high resolution and investigate its composition and the structure of its interior and icy shell.

The life cycle of a NASA science mission includes several key phases. At each step, missions must successfully demonstrate that they have met the agency’s requirements in order to indicate readiness to move forward into the next phase. Phase B includes preliminary design work, while phases C and D include final design, spacecraft fabrication, assembly and testing, and launch.

Image: NASA

Tornado Damage at NASA

Here’s the update to the damage sustained by NASA’s Michoud facility in Louisiana.

By the way:
Hopefully everyone that was able to, had a chance to see the lunar eclipse. When the moon rose over the mountains to the east it was beautiful but very shortly after cirrus clouds moved in and more or less ruined the show. I’m not that sad about the clouds though, it brought the temperatures up from the minus 20 deg C it was to the minus 5 deg C it is now.

I am going to try and do a post early for Monday because we have been assured we can expect 30 cm / 12 inches of snow with strong winds Sunday into Monday.  I’m a bit concerned about having power.  I

Tornado Strikes NASA Facility

NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility was damaged by a tornado yesterday shortly after noon local time. There were reports of one injury of unknown severity and building damage. Michoud is where components to the new Space Launch System (SLS); there was no damage to any of the components such as the hydrogen and oxygen fuel tanks.

A facility assessment is underway so we should know to was extent of the damage shortly.

Active Galactic Nucleus

ic3639

The galaxy above called IC-3639 has an Active Galactic Nucleus that is actually obscured which leads to even more questions.  AGN’s are super-massive black holes (in the order of a million to probably hundreds of million solar masses) that are accreting massive amounts of matter, which is to say “feeding”. The accretion disc makes the Active Galaxies among the brightest objects in terms of electromagnetic radiation, so bright it is not often whether or not a galaxy is active, is in question, IC 3639 is such a galaxy.

A word about black holes in general because some people have a mistaken impression of black holes as marauding monsters roaming the universe looking for innocent planets to swallow up, that just came up on an outing with friends. No, a black holes don’t really do that. In fact if you took a black hole of one-solar-mass and swapped it with our Sun our solar system would just keep right on going just like it does now, aside from light and heat of course, the fabric of space-time would be just as it is now.

From NuSTAR:
IC 3639, a galaxy with an active galactic nucleus, is seen in this image combining data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory.

This galaxy contains an example of a supermassive black hole hidden by gas and dust. Researchers analyzed NuSTAR data from this object and compared them with previous observations from NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the Japanese-led Suzaku satellite. The findings from NuSTAR, which is more sensitive to higher energy X-rays than these observatories, confirm the nature of IC 3639 as an active galactic nucleus that is heavily obscured, and intrinsically much brighter than observed.

NuSTAR is a Small Explorer mission led by Caltech and managed by JPL for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. NuSTAR was developed in partnership with the Danish Technical University and the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The spacecraft was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Virginia. NuSTAR’s mission operations center is at UC Berkeley, and the official data archive is at NASA’s High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center. ASI provides the mission’s ground station and a mirror archive. JPL is managed by Caltech for NASA.

Image and caption: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESO/STScI