Pulsar found in M82

NuSTAR finds a pulsar in M82. Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAO/NOAO

NuSTAR finds a pulsar in M82. Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAO/NOAO

First a brief reminder of the NuSTAR mission:

NuSTAR was launched on June 13, 2012 from above the Kwajalein Atoll region. The launch vehicle was built by Orbital Sciences Corporation, a Pegasus XL rocket. The platform was the “Stargazer” L-1011 aircraft, the rocket was released and dropped for five seconds before the three-stage rocket motor ignited and put the spacecraft into a 650 km by 610 km orbit and deploying the first orbiting telescopes to focus light in the high energy X-ray (3 – 79 keV) region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

It has been two years and now We are getting some nice data including finding a pulsar in the galaxy M82.

From NuSTAR:

High-energy X-rays streaming from a rare and mighty pulsar (magenta), the brightest found to date, can be seen in this new image combining multi-wavelength data from three telescopes. The bulk of a galaxy called Messier 82 (M82), or the “Cigar galaxy,” is seen in visible-light data captured by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory’s 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona. Starlight is white, and lanes of dust appear brown. Low-energy X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory are colored blue, and higher-energy X-ray data from NuSTAR are pink.

The magenta object is what’s known as an ultraluminous X-ray source, or ULX — a source of blazing X-rays. Previously, all ULXs were suspected to be massive black holes up to a few hundred times the mass of the sun. But NuSTAR spotted a pulsing of X-rays from this ULX (called M82 X-2) – a telltale sign of a pulsar, not a black hole. A pulsar is a type a neutron star — a stellar core left over from a supernova explosion — that sends out rotating beams of high-energy radiation. Scientists were surprised to find the pulsar at the root of the ULX because it shines with a luminosity that is more typical of heftier black holes.

NuSTAR data covers the X-ray energy range of 10 to 40 kiloelectron volts (keV), and Chandra covers the range .1 to 10 keV.

More about the very cool NuSTAR launch.

DDO 68 An Odd Little Galaxy

A dwarf galaxy DDO68 might not be as young as it seems.  Copyright: NASA, ESA. Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute)

A dwarf galaxy DDO68 might not be as young as it seems. Copyright: NASA, ESA. Acknowledgement: A. Aloisi (Space Telescope Science Institute)

From the ESA’s Hubble page:

Astronomers have studied galactic evolution for decades, gradually improving our knowledge of how galaxies have changed over cosmic history. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has played a big part in this, allowing astronomers to see further into the distance, and hence further back in time, than any telescope before it – capturing light that has taken billions of years to reach us.

Looking further into the very distant past to observe younger and younger galaxies is very valuable, but it is not without its problems for astronomers. All newly-born galaxies lie very far away from us and appear very small and faint in the images. On the contrary, all the galaxies near to us appear to be old ones.

DDO 68, captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, was one of the best candidates so far discovered for a newly-formed galaxy in our cosmic neighbourhood. The galaxy lies around 39 million light-years away from us; although this distance may seem huge, it is in fact roughly 50 times closer than the usual distances to such galaxies, which are on the order of several billions of light years.

Read the rest at ESA’s Hubble page.

A side note: I thought this dwarf galaxy was actually two galaxies in the process of merging, apparently not?

IC559

IC 559 from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3. Image credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, D. Calzetti (UMass) and the LEGUS Team

IC 559 from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3. Image credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, D. Calzetti (UMass) and the LEGUS Team

While we wait for the Rosetta news of the Philea landing site, let’s have a look at Hubble’s image of IC 559.

IC 559 is observable, barely. It is a small galaxy with a magnitude 14.2; yes you will need a decent telescope and very dark skies. A CCD would help greatly.

Want to try?
Point to: RA: 09h 45m 30s Dec: +09°32’50”. Wait until October when it will rise before daylight.

I have not been able to identify the reddish structure below IC559 also in the image.

From NASA’s Hubble page:

Far beyond the stars in the constellation of Leo (The Lion) is irregular galaxy IC 559.
IC 559 is not your everyday galaxy. With its irregular shape and bright blue spattering of stars, it is a fascinating galactic anomaly. It may look like sparse cloud, but it is in fact full of gas and dust which is spawning new stars.

Discovered in 1893, IC 559 lacks the symmetrical spiral appearance of some of its galactic peers and not does not conform to a regular shape. It is actually classified as a “type Sm” galaxy — an irregular galaxy with some evidence for a spiral structure.
Irregular galaxies make up about a quarter of all known galaxies and do not fall into any of the regular classes of the Hubble sequence. Most of these uniquely shaped galaxies were not always so — IC 559 may have once been a conventional spiral galaxy that was then distorted and twisted by the gravity of a nearby cosmic companion.

This image, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, combines a wide range of wavelengths spanning the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared parts of the spectrum.

Supernova Shockwave

Supernova shockwave in Puppis A. Click for larger. Image credit: NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/IAFE

Supernova shockwave in Puppis A. Click for larger. Image credit: NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/IAFE

Nice!

Below is the caption released with the image, you can get a full-res version here:

The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of infrared and X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton.

The bubbly cloud is an irregular shock wave, generated by a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth 3,700 years ago. The remnant itself, called Puppis A, is around 7,000 light-years away, and the shock wave is about 10 light-years across.

The pastel hues in this image reveal that the infrared and X-ray structures trace each other closely. Warm dust particles are responsible for most of the infrared light wavelengths, assigned red and green colors in this view. Material heated by the supernova’s shock wave emits X-rays, which are colored blue. Regions where the infrared and X-ray emissions blend together take on brighter, more pastel tones.

The shock wave appears to light up as it slams into surrounding clouds of dust and gas that fill the interstellar space in this region.

From the infrared glow, astronomers have found a total quantity of dust in the region equal to about a quarter of the mass of our sun. Data collected from Spitzer’s infrared spectrograph reveal how the shock wave is breaking apart the fragile dust grains that fill the surrounding space.

Supernova explosions forge the heavy elements that can provide the raw material from which future generations of stars and planets will form. Studying how supernova remnants expand into the galaxy and interact with other material provides critical clues into our own origins.

Infrared data from Spitzer’s multiband imaging photometer (MIPS) at wavelengths of 24 and 70 microns are rendered in green and red. X-ray data from XMM-Newton spanning an energy range of 0.3 to 8 kiloelectron volts are shown in blue.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Spacecraft operations are based at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Littleton, Colorado. Data are archived at the Infrared Science Archive housed at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

Hubble Shows Us NGC 121

Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) shows us NGC 121.  Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgment: Stefano Campani

Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) shows us NGC 121. Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgment: Stefano Campani

This is one of those “southern gems” I cannot see. Not far away is NGC 104 and the bright NGC 292 among a host of others in an around the Small Magellanic Cloud.

It’s little wonder I like globulars. I found some of the images I took in the back yard, I’ll post some, nothing like this Hubble image though.

Here is a nice tutorial on Globular Clusters from SEDS.

The NASA caption:

This image shows NGC 121, a globular cluster in the constellation of Tucana (The Toucan). Globular clusters are big balls of old stars that orbit the centers of their galaxies like satellites — the Milky Way, for example, has around 150.

NGC 121 belongs to one of our neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). It was discovered in 1835 by English astronomer John Herschel, and in recent years it has been studied in detail by astronomers wishing to learn more about how stars form and evolve.
Continue reading

Spectacular NGC 1433

NGC 1433 from Hubble.  Click for larger. Copyright ESA/Hubble & NASA

NGC 1433 from Hubble. Click for larger. Copyright ESA/Hubble & NASA

If you venture over to the ESA site you can see a Hi-res version of this beauty.

This view, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows a nearby spiral galaxy known as NGC 1433. At about 32 million light-years from Earth, it is a type of very active galaxy known as a Seyfert galaxy — a classification that accounts for 10% of all galaxies. They have very bright, luminous centres comparable to that of our galaxy, the Milky Way.

Here is a bit more data on NGC 1433 including a “more normal” image to compare this incredible Hubble image too.

NEOWISE Spies Comet Pan-STARRS

The caption from JPL (link has larger still-images):

NASA’s NEOWISE mission captured this series of pictures of comet C/2012 K1 — also known as comet Pan-STARRS — as it swept across our skies on May 20, 2014. The comet is relatively close to us — it was only about 143 million miles (230 million kilometers) from Earth when this picture was taken. It is seen passing a much more distant spiral galaxy, called NGC 3726, which is about 55 million light-years from Earth, or 2 trillion times farther away than the comet.

Source

Spitzer and Chandra Team up

bhjets

This composite of NGC-4258 is a composite from two space based telescopes the Chandra and Spitzer covering the infrared and x-ray wavelengths.

Infrared to X-ray spectrum

NGC 4258 is also known as M106 for being the 106th entry into Charles Messiers famous catalog. The galaxy is visible in optical light so you can see it with some help of course, at a mag 8.4 a small telescope should do. Have a look in Canes Venatici – more specifically RA=12 19.0, Dec=+47 18.

See M106 at SEDS.

The details from JPL:

A composite image of the spiral galaxy NGC 4258 showing X-ray emission observed with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue) and infrared emission observed with NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope (red and green).

The infrared emission is produced by hydrogen molecules. A labeled version of the image shows the direction of radio jets, along with the location of the supermassive black hole driving these jets and “hotspots,” where the jets are striking gas in the galaxy. The X-ray and hydrogen emission are both thought to be caused by shocks, similar to a sonic boom from a supersonic plane. The similarity in location between the X-ray and hydrogen emission and the radio jets implies that the jets have caused the shocks.
Continue reading

Hubble Looks at a Dwarf Galaxy

The dwarf galaxy NGC 5474 as seen by Hubble. Click for larger. Image Credit: ESA/NASA

The dwarf galaxy NGC 5474 as seen by Hubble. Click for larger. Image Credit: ESA/NASA

NGC 5474 is visible to observers in the northern hemisphere. It’s another of the gems in the area of Ursa Major or the Big Dipper.

This is an amazing image.  To see just how good, compare the Hubble image to a pretty good image from the ground (University of Alaska).

A link to the SEDS page for the M 101 galaxy group (mentioned below).

Here’s the caption from the NASA site :

The subject of this Hubble image is NGC 5474, a dwarf galaxy located 21 million light-years away in the constellation of Ursa Major (The Great Bear). This beautiful image was taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).
Continue reading

Perseus Cluster from Chandra

The Perseus Cluster by Chandra. Click for larger. Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/E.Bulbul, et al.

The Perseus Cluster by Chandra. Click for larger. Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/E.Bulbul, et al.

You want big? The Perseus Cluster is BIG!

Perseus A (aka NGC 1275) is 72.7 Mpc (237 million light-years) away in the constellation Perseus of all places.

Perseus is located at RA: 03h 25m 20.601s Dec: +49°54’29.118″,actually the location of Mirfak, the alpha star which means it is the brightest star in the constellation.  Easily visible in the northern sky, it is home to the Double Cluster, a pair of open clusters, simply beautiful, It’s one of my favorites and very easy to find (the link has a finders chart).

From the Chandra site:

This image is Chandra’s latest view of the Perseus Cluster, where red, green, and blue show low, medium, and high-energy X-rays respectively. It combines data equivalent to more than 17 days worth of observing time taken over a decade with Chandra. The Perseus Cluster is one of the most massive objects in the Universe, and contains thousands of galaxies immersed in an enormous cloud of superheated gas.

In Chandra’s X-ray image, enormous bright loops, ripples, and jet-like streaks throughout the cluster can be seen. The dark blue filaments in the center are likely due to a galaxy that has been torn apart and is falling into NGC 1275 (a.k.a. Perseus A), the giant galaxy that lies at the center of the cluster. A different view of Perseus combines data from Chandra in the inner regions of the cluster and XMM data in the outer regions.