Sand Dunes on Mars

It has been a while since I’ve done a Curiosity rover update. Curiosity continues to do great science on Mars, although the wheels are showing more wear and hopefully design modifications are in place for the next rover. Still, Curiosity can get around and with judicious planning it will continue to do so in the future.

The image shows there is wind on Mars and that helps keep Curiosity clean enough to provide power for operations and the wind is strong enough to make ripples in the landscape. One would imagine the texture is very fine because the wind is blowing in a thin atmosphere. The primarily Carbon Dioxide atmosphere (95.6 %) on Mars has a pressure only around 0.6 percent of what we see here on Earth.

NASA – This view from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows two scales of ripples, plus other textures, in an area where the mission examined a linear-shaped dune in the Bagnold dune field on lower Mount Sharp.

The scene is an excerpt from a 360-degree panorama acquired on March 24 and March 25, 2017, (PST) during the 1,647th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity’s work on Mars, at a location called “Ogunquit Beach.”

Crests of the longer ripples visible in the dark sand of the dune are several feet (a few meters) apart. This medium-scale feature in active sand dunes on Mars was one of Curiosity’s findings at the crescent-shaped dunes that the rover examined in late 2015 and early 2016. Ripples that scale are not seen on Earth’s sand dunes. Overlaid on those ripples are much smaller ripples, with crests about ten times closer together.

Textures of the local bedrock in the foreground — part of the Murray formation that originated as lakebed sediments — and of gravel-covered ground (at right) are also visible. The image has been white-balanced so that the colors of the colors of the rock and sand materials resemble how they would appear under daytime lighting conditions on Earth.

Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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