Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3 from Chandra and DSS Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/K. Borkowski et al.; Optical: DSS

Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3 from Chandra and DSS Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/K. Borkowski et al.; Optical: DSS

Here’s a Chandra and Digitized Sky Survey colloboration of a supernova remnant with an un-memorable name: G1.9+03. Ok the name makes perfect sense, just not to most of us.

Anyway, this remnant was found in 2008 and even though it is about 28,000 light-years away, it is in our Milky Way Galaxy. The kind of rule of thumb is a star goes supernova in the Milky Way about twice a century. Astronomers say this supernova would have been seen from Earth a bit more than a hundred years ago had it not been shrouded in dust and gas due to its location near the center of the galaxy.

From the Chandra site (linked below):

The explosion ejected stellar debris at high velocities, creating the supernova remnant that is seen today by Chandra and other telescopes. This new image is a composite from Chandra where low-energy X-rays are red, intermediate energies are green and higher-energy ones are blue. Also shown are optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey, with appearing stars in white. The new Chandra data, obtained in 2011, reveal that G1.9+0.3 has several remarkable properties.

The Chandra webpage for this image spins a pretty good tale about G1.9+0.3 (I should call it George or something. LOL) you can go there and have a quick read.

2 thoughts on “Supernova Remnant G1.9+0.3

    • It could be confused witht he Bee Hive cluster though, M44 I think (just looked and I was correct! LOL)
      Sort of looks like a jellyfish body too.

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