Waiting for Philae

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0

A Rosetta NAVCAM image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from 81.4 km / 50.6 miles. ESA did a nice job of processing the image in order to bring out some of the outflow. The outflow should become more evident over time and give 67P/G-C the classic comet look.

In the mean time Rosetta is intermittently sending radio signals to the Philae lander to establish contact. So far nothing has been heard from the little lander. Possibly the solar panels have not built up enough power in the systems to function or maybe it is just too cold. The lander remains in hibernation.

Philae needs an internal temperature above -45 C / -49 F and five watts of power to turn on – which is pretty impressive. The lander needs to be able to generate 19 watts in order to send signals to Rosetta.

ESA is choosing when to send signals to Philae so the alignment between it and Rosetta and presumably the sun to have the best chance for success. The first half of April will be the next best opportunity to contact.

If you click the image above you will see a version with some of the craters labeled.

Have a look at Rosetta Blog “Waiting patently for Philae” for more detail.

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