NGC 4605

A very nice look at NGC 4605 by Hubble. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts) and the LEGUS Team

A very nice look at NGC 4605 by Hubble. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: D. Calzetti (University of Massachusetts) and the LEGUS Team

Some overlooked viewing opportunities are available in the northern skies. Not surprising, all the action is near the ecliptic and the northern sky is by comparison sparsely populated in the north.

If you are looking for something different, try a good look in and around Ursa Major.

Below is the description from a NASA site, the link will go to that page with larger versions of the image. The description talks about groups or clusters of galaxies and how even they are bound to each other by gravity — good stuff.

Hubble Eyes a Scale of the Universe

This bundle of bright stars and dark dust is a dwarf spiral galaxy known as NGC 4605, located around 16 million light-years away in the constellation of Ursa Major (The Great Bear). This galaxy’s spiral structure is not obvious from this image, but NGC 4605 is classified as an SBc type galaxy — meaning that it has sprawling, loosely wound arms and a bright bar of stars cutting through its center.

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