A Trio of Moons

A trio of Saturn moons from the Cassini spacecraft. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

A trio of Saturn moons from the Cassini spacecraft. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

A nice Cassini image of three of Saturn’s moons and the expanse of rings taken at a low angle.

The largest of the three is Tethys, moving to the left we have the weirdest of the three and my personal favorite moon, Hyperion.

The last of the three is the one I call the potato, Prometheus, you will find it in the foreground right into to the edge of the rings. Actually Prometheus is inside the F ring, it has a partner on the outside of the F ring not shown here called Pandora. These two moons are known as shepherd moons and they keep the F ring nice and tidy.

Then there are the rings, the low angle perspective shows exquisite detail.

Be sure to pay a visit to our Saturn page and scroll down to the “Saturn’s Satellite” section and click on the image to the right for a guide.

See the original image at JPL

A Crescent Mimas

The crescent of the battered Mimas. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The crescent of the battered Mimas. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The Saturn moon Mimas was the target of Cassini’s cameras. One of the striking features of the moon is a crater known as Herschel. Herschel can be seen in the shadows at about the five o’clock position.

More about Mimas and a great look at the crater Herschel can be found here.

About the image from the Cassini site:

A thin sliver of Mimas is illuminated, the long shadows showing off its many craters, indicators of the moon’s violent history.
The most famous evidence of a collision on Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across) is the crater Herschel that gives Mimas its Death Star-like appearance. See Examining Herschel Crater for more on Herschel.

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 40 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on May 20, 2013.

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 100,000 miles (200,000 kilometers) from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 130 degrees. Image scale is 4,000 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel.
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The North of Saturn

The north of Saturn from Cassini.  Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The north of Saturn from Cassini. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

A great image of Saturn from the Cassini spacecraft. Click the image above to see some of the detail in the atmosphere. Saturn’s atmospheric zones resemble the ones on Jupiter but thanks to lower surface gravity the clouds are more spread out, so are less defined. Saturn’s atmosphere is also colder than Jupiter as you might expect.

Like Jupiter, Saturn radiates more energy into space than it receives from the sun. What you might not expect is when size is taken into account, Saturn radiates more energy into space from its interior than Jupiter – by about 25 percent.

NASA calls this release The Ring King and for good reason:

Saturn reigns supreme, encircled by its retinue of rings. Although all four giant planets have ring systems, Saturn’s is by far the most massive and impressive. Scientists are trying to understand why by studying how the rings have formed and how they have evolved over time. Also seen in this image is Saturn’s famous north polar vortex and hexagon. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 4, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 2 million miles (3 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 110 miles (180 kilometers) per pixel. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

The Eye of Saturn

A new look at the northern polar vortex on Saturn.  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

A new look at the northern polar vortex on Saturn. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Not really an eye of course, but it kind of looks like one.  This is a close up view of the northern polar vortex on Saturn taken from the Cassini spacecraft.  I enlarged the image and enhanced it a little to bring out the details a little more.  You can see the original here.

That “eye” is 2,000 km / 1,240 miles across, you can see clouds as them move some 150 meters per sec / 330 miles per hour.

Cassini was 2.2 million km / 1.4 million miles from Saturn at the time the image was taken.

 

 

Bahgdad on Enceladus

Looking across the geyser basin of the moon Enceladus along the fractures responsible for some of the water vapor and ices spewed into space.  Images: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Looking across the geyser basin of the moon Enceladus along the fractures responsible for some of the water vapor and ices spewed into space. Images: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Possibly the best image ever of the Saturn moon Enceladus, well in my opinion. Be sure to click the image above for a larger version. This image looks towards the Baghdad and Damascus area of the moon. Here’s an annotated version.

From the Cassini website:

Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers and More on Icy Saturn Moon

The Crescent Saturn

Cassini sees a crescent on Saturn from 2 million km.  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Cassini sees a crescent on Saturn from 2 million km. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Cassini treats us to a view we would otherwise not get, a crescent Saturn. The view is from the unilluminated side of the rings and was taken in green light.

The angle us just right at 43 degrees below the ringplane so the rings don’t appear to interrupt the crescent. You may notice the “dark” area outside the crescent is faintly illuminated and that is from “ringshine”.

Get a full res version here at JPL’s Cassini site.

Saturn Weather

cassiniNPV

Here is the latest from the Cassini spacecraft. click the image above for a larger version to see a surprising amount of detail in the planet’s atmosphere.

Here’s the caption from JPL:

The Cassini spacecraft captures three magnificent sights at once: Saturn’s north polar vortex and hexagon along with its expansive rings.

The hexagon, which is wider than two Earths, owes its appearance to the jet stream that forms its perimeter. The jet stream forms a six-lobed, stationary wave which wraps around the north polar regions at a latitude of roughly 77 degrees North.

This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on April 2, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers.

The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.2 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 43 degrees. Image scale is 81 miles (131 kilometers) per pixel.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Atlas

The tiny Saturn moon Atlas. Image Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The tiny Saturn moon Atlas. Image Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Nice! The Saturn moon Atlas, not one we often get to see. Atlas was discovered in 1980 thanks to the Voyager spacecraft and JPL employee Richard Terrile. As moons go Atlas is tiny being only around 30 km (18 miles) in diameter.

From the Cassini site:

The Cassini spacecraft captures a glimpse of the moon Atlas shortly after emerging from Saturn’s shadow. Although the sunlight at Saturn’s distance is feeble compared to that at the Earth, objects cut off from the Sun within Saturn’s shadow cool off considerably.

 

Scientists study how the moons around Saturn cool and warm as they enter and leave Saturn’s shadow to better understand the physical properties of Saturn’s moons.

This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 44 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 23, 2014.

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.6 million miles (2.6 million kilometers) from Atlas and at a Sun-Atlas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 93 degrees. Image scale is 10 miles (16 kilometers) per pixel.

Prometheus

Prometheus a shephard moon of Saturn. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Prometheus a shepherd moon of Saturn. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The little moon Prometheus is featured in this image is creating channels (gores) and streamers in the F ring of Saturn. Prometheus and Pandora are believed to be responsible for much of the structure of the ring.  Can’t see the moon?  Look at the speck at about 10 O’clock.

Prometheus is only 86 km (53 miles) across and has an orbit that regularly brings it to the F ring. When the encounter occurs as we can see the gores where it enters and streamers pulled away in its wake as it exits.

There is a movie of this happening and you can see it here.

A Blue Orb

Cassini see a blue orb on the horizon. Click for larger.  NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Cassini see a blue orb on the horizon. Click for larger. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

It’s not us though, Cassini gets an image of Saturn’s neighbor Uranus for the first time. It’s the bright blue dot in the top-left. Although it has been brightened in this image, it is pretty much that color. I’ve taken images and they were never this good of course but color did show, I’ll see if I can find them.
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