Messier 61 by HUbble

The galaxy known as M61 as seen by Hubble. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NAS, Acknowledgement: Det58

The galaxy known as M61 as seen by Hubble. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NAS, Acknowledgement: Det58

This image of the galaxy M61 by Hubble. This galaxy is a very nice telescope target and if you have dark skies possibly even binoculars can pick it out. Currently M61 is leading Mars so if you can see Mars you can see this galaxy.

M61 from SEDS.

The description from NASA and ESA:

This new Hubble picture is the sharpest ever image of the core of spiral galaxy Messier 61. Taken using the High Resolution Channel of Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, the central part of the galaxy is shown in striking detail.
Also known as NGC 4303, this galaxy is roughly 100,000 light-years across, comparable in size to our galaxy, the Milky Way. Both Messier 61 and our home galaxy belong to a group of galaxies known as the Virgo Supercluster in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin) — a group of galaxy clusters containing up to 2,000 spiral and elliptical galaxies in total.
Messier 61 is a type of galaxy known as a starburst galaxy. Starburst galaxies experience an incredibly high rate of star formation, hungrily using up their reservoir of gas in a very short period of time (in astronomical terms). But this is not the only activity going on within the galaxy; deep at its heart there is thought to be a supermassive black hole that is violently spewing out radiation.
Despite its inclusion in the Messier Catalogue, Messier 61 was actually discovered by Italian astronomer Barnabus Oriani in 1779. Charles Messier also noticed this galaxy on the very same day as Oriani, but mistook it for a passing comet — the comet of 1779.

A Graceful Arc

A gravitaional lensed galaxy from Hubble and Hershel. Credit: NASA/STScI; S. Allam and team; and the Master Lens Database, L. A. Moustakas, K. Stewart, et al (2014)

A gravitaional lensed galaxy from Hubble and Hershel. Credit: NASA/STScI; S. Allam and team; and the Master Lens Database, L. A. Moustakas, K. Stewart, et al (2014)

Hubble and Herschel combine to study the galaxy known as S0901 seen here as a arc. The arc is a result of huge gravitational forces from a galaxy or galaxies between us and the galactic arc, gravity so strong light from the more distant S0901 is actually magnified and bent into an arc.

Fascinating stuff! I do wonder if we will ever be able to sort of reverse engineer the arc into some semblance of the actual hidden galaxy.

target=”blank’>More images and the following caption at NASA:

The young galaxy SDSS090122.37+181432.3, also known as S0901, is seen here as the bright arc to the left of the central bright galaxy. The distorted view of S0901 is caused by gravitational lensing, resulting from one or more galaxies that lie between the observer and S0901. Although one effect of lensing is to distort the image, another effect is to magnify the light of the lensed object. This effect was used to enable scientists to study S0901 with Herschel’s Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI).

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Hubble’s View of NGC 3455

Hubble used the Advance Camera for Surveys to get this look at NGC 3455.  Credit:  ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

Hubble used the Advance Camera for Surveys to get this look at NGC 3455. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

Located at RA: 10 51 52/DEC: 17 33.1 in the constellation Leo. The photo caption at NASA and included below pegs the distance at 65 million light-years what it doesn’t say is the red-shift velocity is about 1102 km sec / 685 miles per second!

The companion galaxy mentioned in the press release NGC 3454 can be seen here. NGC 3455 is the galaxy just below center and above that you can see the bright star in the center and the cigar shaped NGC 3454 above that.  Image: Simbad

The companion galaxy mentioned in the press release NGC 3454 can be seen here. NGC 3455 is the galaxy at the  center and above that you can see the bright star (from the Hubble image) in the center and the cigar shaped NGC 3454 above that. Image: Simbad

A very nice image and you can get more sizes at the link below.

The NASA/Hubble press release:

Shown here is a spiral galaxy known as NGC 3455, which lies some 65 million light-years away from us in the constellation of Leo (the Lion).

Galaxies are classified into different types according to their structure and appearance. This classification system is known as the Hubble Sequence, named after its creator Edwin Hubble.
In this image released 14, April, 2014, NGC 3455 is known as a type SB galaxy — a barred spiral. Barred spiral galaxies account for approximately two thirds of all spirals. Galaxies of this type appear to have a bar of stars slicing through the bulge of stars at their center. The SB classification is further sub-divided by the appearance of a galaxy’s pinwheeling spiral arms; SBa types have more tightly wound arms, whereas SBc types have looser ones. SBb types, such as NGC 3455, lie in between.
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The Tadpole

The Tadpole and the Wriggler. Click for larger. Copyright NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), and IPHAS

I want to see the Goldfish. Ok I spent five minutes looking for it until I re-read the press release and the bit about it being just out of view. Larger and full-res versions availble at the link below.

BTW, I LOVE the title from ESA for selfish reasons. LOL.

From ESA Spaceinimages (The Tadpole and the Wriggler):

A bright blue tadpole appears to swim through the inky blackness of space. Known as IRAS 20324+4057 but dubbed “the Tadpole”, this clump of gas and dust has given birth to a bright protostar, one of the earliest steps in building a star.

There are actually multiple protostars within this tadpole’s ‘head’, but the glowing yellow one in this image is the most luminous and massive. When this protostar has gathered together enough mass from its surroundings, it will eventually emerge as a fully-fledged young star.

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C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

Hubble Sees Mars-Bound Comet Sprout Multiple Jets

Hubble’s latest look at comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) on its way to a close encounter with Mars.

Source: Hubblesite.org

Hubble gives us this updated image of C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring). The image is all the better knowing the comet is somewhere around a magnitude 18 or so making it thousands of times fainter than we can see. Clicking the image will take you to Hubblesite. Clicking here will take you directly to the Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)image page at Hubblesite.

From Hubble:

Comet Siding Spring is plunging toward the Sun along a roughly 1-million-year orbit. The comet, discovered in 2013, was within the radius of Jupiter’s orbit when the Hubble Space Telescope photographed it on March 11, 2014. Hubble resolves two jets of dust coming from the solid icy nucleus. These persistent jets were first seen in Hubble pictures taken on Oct. 29, 2013. The feature should allow astronomers to measure the direction of the nucleus’s pole, and hence, rotation axis. The comet will make its closest approach to our Sun on Oct. 25, 2014, at a distance of 130 million miles, well outside Earth’s orbit. On its inbound leg, Comet Siding Spring will pass within 84,000 miles of Mars on Oct. 19, 2014, which is less than half the Moon’s distance from Earth. The comet is not expected to become bright enough to be seen by the naked eye.

DEM L241

A supernova and a surviving companion star. Click for larger. Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/F. Seward et al; Optical: NOAO/CTIO/MCELS, DSS

We are looking at a binary star system or rather what is left of a binary star system after one of the stars goes supernova. The surviving star is hidden the debris field of the supernova but it survived the explosion. I have to wonder what that star is going through, I’d be surprised if it wasn’t undergoing changes because of the explosion, I can picture siesmic waves ringing through it. We will probably never know for sure.

The image above is a composite of contributions from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes including those in Chili and the Digitized Sky Survey.

There are desktop sizes to the image and they are wonderful! You can get them and read the details on DEM L241 here.

24 years of Hubble

From ESA’s Space in Images this amazing Hubble image of the Monkey Head Nebula (in Orion) – the link has full-res versions of the image.

Hubble was launched on 24 April 1990, coming up on 24 years. The last servicing mission to Hubble was in 2009 which hopefully will extend the life of Hubble until 2021. I should note the expected life of Hubble after the servicing is published to be 2014 to 2021 – hopefully closer to the latter.

The James Webb Telescope is expected to launch in 2018.

About the image (from ESA):

Each year the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope releases a brand new image to celebrate its birthday. This year, the subject of its 24th celebratory snap is part of the Monkey Head Nebula, last viewed by Hubble in 2001, creating a stunning image released in 2011.

Otherwise known as NGC 2174, this cloud of gas and dust lies about 6400 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter). Nebulas like this one are popular targets for Hubble – their colourful plumes of gas and fiery bright stars create ethereally beautiful pictures, such as the telescope’s 22nd and 23rd anniversary images of the Tarantula and Horsehead nebulas.

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Roberts 22

The Butterfly nebula by Hubble. Credit: NASA, ESA, and R. Sahai (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

The Butterfly nebula by Hubble. Credit: NASA, ESA, and R. Sahai (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

The Interstellar Butterfly is Hubble’s Picture of the Week. Robert’s 22 is just another name for the nebula. This is what happens to a star like our own Sun as it ends its life. Stars of this size don’t blow up, rather they shed their envelopes and produce nebulae of various shapes and all beautiful.

The lobes in Roberts 22 have some outflows said to move at 450 km/s, that’s like a million miles per hour!

Pay a visit to the site and see a great archive of images.

Here’s the caption to the image:

They say the flap of a butterfly’s wings can set off a tornado on the other side of the world. But what happens when a butterfly flaps its wings in the depths of space?

This cosmic butterfly is a nebula known as AFGL 4104, or Roberts 22. Caused by a star that is nearing the end of its life and has shrugged off its outer layers, the nebula emerges as a cosmic chrysalis to produce this striking sight. Studies of the lobes of Roberts 22 have shown an amazingly complex structure, with countless intersecting loops and filaments.

A butterfly’s life span is counted in weeks; although on a much longer timescale, this stage of life for Roberts 22 is also transient. It is currently a preplanetary nebula, a short-lived phase that begins once a dying star has pushed much of the material in its outer layers into space, and ends once this stellar remnant becomes hot enough to ionise the surrounding gas clouds and make them glow. About 400 years ago, the star at the centre of Roberts 22 shed its outer shells, which raced outwards to form this butterfly. The central star will soon be hot enough to ionise the surrounding gas, and it will evolve into a fully fledged planetary nebula.

Star Factory from Herschel

A Star Factory as seen my Herschel. Copyright ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE. Acknowledgements: Cassie Fallscheer (University of Victoria), Mike Reid (University of Toronto) and the Herschel HOBYS team

A Star Factory as seen my Herschel. Copyright ESA/Herschel/PACS/SPIRE. Acknowledgements: Cassie Fallscheer (University of Victoria), Mike Reid (University of Toronto) and the Herschel HOBYS team

Nice! This is Herschel’s look at NGC 7538 a giant cloud of hydrogen and bits of dust – a stellar nursery. The dust also shines in the far-infrared which works out great for Herschel, ESA’s far-infrared space observatory.

Have a look at the Simbad page for NGC 7538 for a different view of it (optical I think).

Be sure to pay a visit to ESA’s Star factory NGC 7538 for the particulars.