European Researchers’ Night

The anisotropies of the Cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by Planck. The CMB is a snapshot of the oldest light in our Universe, imprinted on the sky when the Universe was just 380 000 years old. It shows tiny temperature fluctuations that correspond to regions of slightly different densities, representing the seeds of all future structure: the stars and galaxies of today.  Caption and image: ESA and the Planck Collaboration

The anisotropies of the Cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by Planck. The CMB is a snapshot of the oldest light in our Universe, imprinted on the sky when the Universe was just 380 000 years old. It shows tiny temperature fluctuations that correspond to regions of slightly different densities, representing the seeds of all future structure: the stars and galaxies of today. Caption and image: ESA and the Planck Collaboration

This sounds pretty interesting and I’m going to check it out. Mark you calendars for September 27th and if you can’t make it in person there will be a webcast linked below.

Yes this is plenty early, however the 27th is on a Friday so early notice is a good idea. I’ll put up a reminder a couple days before. Hope you can make it.

The press release:

18 September 2013 CERN, ESA, ESO and UNESCO in partnership with the Italian Institute of Astrophysics invite the public to Origins 2013, an exceptional event taking place simultaneously in Geneva, Paris and Bologna on European Researchers’ Night, 27 September.

People around the world are invited to follow the event live through a webcast to celebrate the achievements of particle physics and astrophysics. Together, these research areas address fundamental questions linked to our origins, from the origin of matter to the origin of the Universe itself.

Major scientific breakthroughs have been made in these fields in just the last year. CERN’s Large Hadron Collider discovered a Higgs boson – one of the most fundamental particles of our Universe, predicted only by theory until now – while ESA’s Planck space telescope produced the most precise picture of the cosmic microwave background, the relic radiation from the Big Bang.

Meanwhile, the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) was inaugurated in Chile and is already providing unprecedented views of the cosmos.

Origins 2013 will showcase these fascinating scientific endeavours and more, highlighting the strong link between the subatomic world accessed only by particle physics to the unimaginably large Universe studied by astrophysicists.

The rest of the press release.

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